Evidence-based
medicine (EBM) is the integration of using medical research with validating results
to help educate, diagnose, and treat patients in clinical practice. It is a movement which aims
to increase the use of high quality clinical research in clinical decision
making.1 EBM is not merely used to provide a specific “answer,” to
clinical questions but rather, as a guide for clinicians to make medical decisions
collectively with their patients about the details of the condition and/or
treatment plan. Research evidence may still be key to making the right
decision—but it does not determine that decision. Clinicians may provide
information, but they are also trained to make ethical and technical judgments,
and they hold a socially recognized role to care, comfort, and bear witness to
suffering.2

The practice of
evidence-based medicine is a process of lifelong, self-directed, problem-based
learning in which caring for one’s own patients creates the need for clinically
important information about diagnosis, prognosis, therapy and other clinical
and health care issues.1 The key here being that EBM is a process of
learning that is lifelong, self-directed, and problem-based. Similar to EBM, clinicians
are lifelong learners as they are continuously learning about the advancements
of medicine. Medicine is constantly evolving. Therefore, research on diseases,
drugs, management, etc. are constantly being updated. Thus, it is extremely important
for clinicians to remain up to date with medical knowledge.

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There are many
sources that help clinicians keep up with the most up to date evidence based
research and information including, The New England Journal of Medicine, American
Journal of Medicine, UpToDate, and so much more. As a Physician Assistant
student, the American
Academy of Physician Assistants and Journal of the American Academy of
Physician Assistants have been my top resources throughout my academic phase thus
far.